Raising Guinea Fowl

Raising Guinea fowl is becoming  more and more popular. I have had Guineas since 2009. I started with 3 and now have around 60....ish. My original trio were the standard pearl Guineas, but I now have Guineas in pearl, pied, white, lavender, slate and royal purple. Raising Guineas is a lot like raising chickens, but in a few aspects they are different This page will be updated frequently to contain links to all my posts specifically about Guinea fowl.

Finding a Guinea nest with a thermal camera

hidden guinea nests


12 Reasons why you should raise Guinea fowl
Why raise guineas
 

Sexing Guinea Fowl by sound
guinea fowl farm


 14 Reasons you should NOT raise Guinea fowl
raising guinea hens


12 tips for finding Guinea nests
guineas hide nest



The Guinea wattle myth
guinea hen wattles


Are Guineas Cold Hardy?


Are you my Mother? 
(letting a chicken raise Guinea keets)
guinea chicks with hen


Guineas eat stink bugs!
guinea hen in garden


The only white baby bird
guinea fowl colors white

Don't touch the snow!!! 
(how Guineas blend in with the trees in winter)
cold hardy poultry



Ok....that's it for now. I will add more Guinea specific posts as I write them. Feel free to comment below if you have a question that you would like me to answer in a post or directly.

~L

9 comments:

  1. I have a rather sensitive question. We have a guinea that needs to be put down. He is suffering. We've never had to do this before and are having a really hard time doing it, much less figuring out the best way to do it. Any suggestions that would make it humane?

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    Replies
    1. I'm sorry to hear about your Guinea, it's always hard to say goodbye to a pet.

      I believe the most humane way to put down a Guinea would be the quickest. For me that is removing the head. I use a pair of tree branch pruners to cut the neck....severing the head from the body. Sorry, I can think of a delicate way to put it....but basically just put the neck between the blades and squeeze. When the handles are completely together and the blades are closed then it's done. I usually just open the handles and walk away at this point. The body will spasm but the life is over. Watching it hurts me, the bird no longer feels it.

      You can email me also if you have other questions. MuranoHatchery@Gmail.com
      ~L

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  2. Hello there,

    We have almost 20 Guinea Fowl on the property and they are all in a pen to keep them safe from predators. On some occasions there have been a few that escape and hang around the pen. We would really like to have the free to roam the property but they will escape and disappear into the jungle. Any idea's how to have them come back to roost in the same pen every night so that we can lock them in and then let them out the next morning like the chickens? Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. I train mine to come in at night with scratch...but, when the weather is warm they would much rather roost in the trees. When winter sets in they start sleeping in the coop again. I can't guarantee they will go inside, but once they know where home is they should at least come back and sleep in the trees close by.

      Good luck,
      ~L

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    2. We keep about half of our 13 guineas in their enclosure and let half free-range. It seems that keeps them from straying too far (off of our property).

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  3. I live in SE AZ. I have 3 adult females and 1 male. Is it possible that none will go broody? So far, they all come in at night. I lost one last year to not finding her nest....

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    Replies
    1. It's possible. I have some that have never been broody....in fact in the Guinea house (non free-range) there are probably 20 females and I only get maybe 4 broodys a year. I would guess about 1/2 of my free range Guinea hens go broody yearly. While it is possible, it's probable that at least 1 will go broody. If you find the nest, remove only a few eggs a day and they'll keep using it. (always leave at least a few) That way if one goes broody, you'll know where to find her! Good luck!

      ~L

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  4. Replies
    1. I've found mine a few acres away in the woods. They always come back, but they do wander kind of far.

      ~L

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